Tissue Salts are now in stock

Life Key Essences is now stocking Tissue Salts.  These available for direct purchase only and won’t be available in the online shop.  Single remedies are $13 and combination remedies are $17.  These are great for a range of issues and very easy for children to take.

Fumitory

Fumitory (Fumaria Officianalis) has long been used for treating skin problems like scabies, eczema and acne.  It has a bitter taste and is good for stimulating the liver and gallbladder.  Culpeper has a long list of uses for fumitory including leprosy, jaundice, plague and pestilence!  “The distilled water also…helps with all sores of the mouth and throat, being gargled often therewith.”    Fumitory can be toxic in large doses.  I’ve been eating small amounts, cut up finely, in my salads. The leaves and flowers can be used.

 

Mallow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mallow (Malva Sylvestris) leaves and flowers can be added to salads and soups or made into a tea.  Traditionally it has been used to make a soothing syrup for coughs, sore throats and inflammation of the respiratory passages.   It’s also soothing to the urinary tract and intestines.  Mallow helps to cleanse and strengthen the lymph system.  Externally it can be applied to wounds and sores as a wash, or used as a poultice on irritations.

Chickweed

Chickweed (Stellaria Media) is a great addition to salads and sandwiches.  While some books say you can cook it, I find that cooking makes it mushy and unappealing.  It has a mild taste, which makes it a great replacement for lettuce.  It can also be made into a tea using either fresh or dried leaves.

Other names for Chickweed include Adder’s mouth, starwort, stitchwort, tongue grass and winter weed,

It is rich in iron, contains calcium, cobalt, molybdenum, magnesium, manganese, silicon, zinc, vitamin c and has a protein content of 15-20%.

Chickweed has many healing applications including applying the fresh leaves, or an ointment,  to bruises, irritations and skin disorders such as eczema or psoriasis.  It has also been found to relieve painful joints, tendons and ligaments.  It is soothing to the digestive system, easing inflammation and ulceration.

Culpeper states that “the herb bruised or the juice applied with cloths or sponges dipped therein to the region of the liver, and as they dry to have it fresh applied, doth wonderfully temperate the heat of the liver, and is effectual for all imposthumes, and swellings whatsoever, for all redness in the face, wheals, pushes, itch, scabs: the juice either simply used or boiled with hog’s grease applied, helpeth cramps, convulsions, and palsy.”

I’m not quite sure what an “imposthume” is and I think I’ll give the hog’s grease a miss, but I’m currently enjoying  eating this almost daily in a salad.

 

Weeds for dinner

I didn’t manage to plant many things in the vegie patch in Autumn and while the onions, garlic and broad beans I put in are doing well, there is little else apart from some greens I planted recently.

While my vegie’s are looking sad, I’ve done a great job growing weeds.

So tonight I’m making a weed salad full of this nutrient rich, vibrant greenery.

I’ve got chick weed, dandelion, calendula, fumitory, mallow and some herb robert, which I’ve topped off with some onion greens.  I’ll add some fetta and olives and have a fabulous salad that grew itself.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time to slow down…

It’s almost mid winter and we should be taking some time out in front of the fire and slowing down.  My Winter post from last year can give you more information on the Water Element and the kidney and bladder meridians.  Nurture yourself with warming winter soups and stews.  Allow yourself to relax and regenerate, don’t keep pushing on when you are tired.  Resting now will enable you to be ready for action in Spring.