Bush Essences

Over the last couple of years I’ve been venturing into the bush around Bendigo making a series of bush essences.  These essences are as much about place as about person, made in damaged landscapes that in some way reflect our inner terrain. The project is now finished (or so I believe for the moment)!

In total there are 11 essences.  The first 7 will go into the online shop today, the next 4 will be there soon.  You can read about all of these new essences here.

This has been quite a journey for me and my four legged essence assistant as we moved out of the backyard essence laboratory and into the open spaces.  We’ve both covered a lot of country and I feel quite transformed by the process.  I hope that these essences resonate with you.

Core Light Healing

I was excited to find out recently that Barbara Ann Brennan has a new book out “Core Light Healing”.  This book follows on from her earlier two books “Hands of Light” and “Light Emerging”.  These books have been hugely influential in my life and the lives of many energetic workers.

The new book looks at the creative process and how we can heal wounds to become co-creators of our lives.  You can follow this link for further information on this great book https://www.barbarabrennan.com/core-light-healing/

I’m still reading it slowly as there is plenty of information to digest.

Welcome to 2018

Yesterday I welcomed in the New Year by doing readings with friends.  This seems like a lovely new tradition to embrace.  My challenge card for the year is The Fool.  The Fool is the zero card of the tarot, the first stage of a new journey.

The Fool is an innocent, embarking on a journey with spontaneity and trust.  The Motherpeace Tarot says “The Fool is not afraid to believe in something divine or greater than ego.  She invites a return of the Mysteries and a leap of faith into cosmic experience.”

So, I’m taking a leap into foolishness, placing greater trust in the flow of life and aiming to avoid tripping myself up through logic or over thinking everything.

My keyword for the year is “trust”.  What is your keyword for 2018?


Fumitory (Fumaria Officianalis) has long been used for treating skin problems like scabies, eczema and acne.  It has a bitter taste and is good for stimulating the liver and gallbladder.  Culpeper has a long list of uses for fumitory including leprosy, jaundice, plague and pestilence!  “The distilled water also…helps with all sores of the mouth and throat, being gargled often therewith.”    Fumitory can be toxic in large doses.  I’ve been eating small amounts, cut up finely, in my salads. The leaves and flowers can be used.










Mallow (Malva Sylvestris) leaves and flowers can be added to salads and soups or made into a tea.  Traditionally it has been used to make a soothing syrup for coughs, sore throats and inflammation of the respiratory passages.   It’s also soothing to the urinary tract and intestines.  Mallow helps to cleanse and strengthen the lymph system.  Externally it can be applied to wounds and sores as a wash, or used as a poultice on irritations.


Chickweed (Stellaria Media) is a great addition to salads and sandwiches.  While some books say you can cook it, I find that cooking makes it mushy and unappealing.  It has a mild taste, which makes it a great replacement for lettuce.  It can also be made into a tea using either fresh or dried leaves.

Other names for Chickweed include Adder’s mouth, starwort, stitchwort, tongue grass and winter weed,

It is rich in iron, contains calcium, cobalt, molybdenum, magnesium, manganese, silicon, zinc, vitamin c and has a protein content of 15-20%.

Chickweed has many healing applications including applying the fresh leaves, or an ointment,  to bruises, irritations and skin disorders such as eczema or psoriasis.  It has also been found to relieve painful joints, tendons and ligaments.  It is soothing to the digestive system, easing inflammation and ulceration.

Culpeper states that “the herb bruised or the juice applied with cloths or sponges dipped therein to the region of the liver, and as they dry to have it fresh applied, doth wonderfully temperate the heat of the liver, and is effectual for all imposthumes, and swellings whatsoever, for all redness in the face, wheals, pushes, itch, scabs: the juice either simply used or boiled with hog’s grease applied, helpeth cramps, convulsions, and palsy.”

I’m not quite sure what an “imposthume” is and I think I’ll give the hog’s grease a miss, but I’m currently enjoying  eating this almost daily in a salad.